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  • in reply to: Introduction #1200
    Admin
    Keymaster

    Hi plazadental, thanks for joining the forum and introducing yourself!

    You are welcome to promote yourself and your clinic by answering questions that people have posted. Here are a couple that still need to be answered:

    https://www.dentalimplantcostguide.com/topic/blood-leakage-after-implants/
    https://www.dentalimplantcostguide.com/topic/pain-after-implant/

    Looking forward to seeing you around here 🙂

    in reply to: Allergic Reaction to Bone Graft? #1093
    Admin
    Keymaster

    Hi Anthony,

    Thank you for taking the time to leave a comment and I’m sorry to hear about your problem with your bone graft.

    I can’t speak from personal experience, but based on the information you’ve provided it sounds like you might be having an allergic reaction to the bone graft (your body is rejecting it). What was the source of the bone that was grafted? Was it from your body, synthetic, etc?

    The problems could also be due to an infection, but I’d say that this is less likely since you have finished the antibiotics. Nerve damage is also a possibility (based on the tingling in your neck and face).

    If the symptoms have persisted for 3 weeks I HIGHLY suggest visiting your dentist ASAP. They will be able to pinpoint what the problem is and removal of the graft might be necessary. I don’t think more time will help at this point and your symptoms are definitely not a normal part of the healing process.

    in reply to: Advice on implants or dentures #1002
    Admin
    Keymaster

    Hi Vennetia,

    We actually just recently posted this comparison of implants and dentures. Please check it out and if you have questions or want clarification on any part of it, please post them here in this thread!

    Alex

    in reply to: Can I Sue My Dentist for Malpractice? #997
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    Reply from Greg:

    Thanks for the advise. I think I will go at least talk to an attorney about this situation. It’s been going on way too long and now I have to go through more pain at the oral surgeon to have the graph removed. I bled for 3 days when he did the graph, someone else will remove it. I will keep in touch with you on this one. Thanks again, Greg

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 10 months ago by Admin.
    in reply to: Can I Sue My Dentist for Malpractice? #996
    Admin
    Keymaster

    No problem! I’m far from a legal expert, but it sounds to me like your dentist has made several mistakes: leaving the root in your gum (malpractice/negligence), ignoring your complaints (leaving YOU to demand/order the x-ray yourself) and all the pain you’ve experienced in general. This combination sounds like you definitely have a leg to stand on, which is why, if I were in your position, I’d talk to a lawyer. Search “dental malpractice lawyer” in Google to find some possible options.

    Your dentist should have malpractice insurance, so you shouldn’t feel bad about suing him as it wont come out of his pockets.

    Good luck, and let me know how it goes!

    in reply to: Can I Sue My Dentist for Malpractice? #965
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    Keymaster

    Reply from Greg:

    Alex, Thanks for the response. I went back several times before demanding an x-ray, reason is is that my dentist kept insisting it was a dry socket and he kept packing it with clove, nasty stuff!. It took so long because he kept demanding that it was the worst dry socket that he has ever seen. I was getting irritated with the continued pain in my jaw.

    I did consent to the graph and implant because I thought he was trying to make things better. And I liked the idea of having a new tooth at his expense. He also promised a bridge for the teeth I am missing on the top. I went back yesterday and he x-rayed my jaw and say’s he did not see anything but has referred me to an oral surgeon for more pain and suffering to have the graph removed, all at his cost.

    I am not sue happy and I truly like my dentist but I think I should be compensated for all the discomfort I have been it at his hands. I am going on 2/2 to the oral surgeon but I think it wouldn’t hurt to talk to an attorney about my situation. He admitted his mistake and said he would make it right, when? Thanks for listening and do you think I have a leg to stand on with the pain and suffering he has caused me?

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 10 months ago by Admin.
    Admin
    Keymaster

    1) What reasons did Dr. Devos provide when he said you were a good candidate for implants?
    2) What reasons has he given to explain why the implants have failed multiple times?

    If he hasn’t given any reasons or states that reasons such as lack of bone density are the cause of failure but hasn’t suggested a bone graft to increase the chance of success, then he might not know what he is doing.

    If Dr Devos is unwilling to refund any of what you paid even though you’ve received nothing but pain (first sign of a dishonest/amoral dentist), cannot provide any legitimate reason why the implants have failed multiple times and you think you can prove that he is guilty of malpractice using the x-rays, not trying a bone graft and the testimony of the technician, then I would consider consulting a legal professional (who is familiar with dental cases) to see if they think you have a case against him. The legal consultation might not be free, but $10,000 is a lot of money so it might be worth doing everything you can to get some of it back.

    Another thing I would do is find another (more trustworthy) dentist or oral surgeon in your area and tell them your story, get them to inspect your teeth, their opinion on the work that Dr. Davos did and their advice as to what you should do next. There might be a small fee for this, but again, it’s worth it considering the situation you’re in and the importance of your dental health.

    Please note that I am not a professional and that this is all my personal opinion and thoughts on the matter.

    Admin
    Keymaster

    Reply from Linda:

    Dr Devos did give me a check up and took a head scan and told me I was a good candidate for the implants. I really don’t think he knows what he is doing he put 4 implants in, all 4 have come out one by one I have two he put back in and tried to put 2 more back they fell out so now he wants to try again and I am really afraid to go back I talked to him the last time I went (before Christmas) and told him I was very disappoint in his work and I would like to forget the whole thing and get a refund so I could try something else he ask me why I thought I would get a refund and I told him because I didn’t have any teeth.

    The dentures he made do not fit or line up with the implants I wear my old ones and put cushions on them. No I have never had a bone graft, but the tech he has in his office told me confidentially and she showed me the x-ray where in didn’t put the implant in deep enough and it didn’t catch the bone and she was sure it would fall out before to long. I don’t think I can go though the pain anymore every time a attachment comes lose he cuts the gum and stitches it up so I can’t wear my teeth for about a week. I am really going crazy trying to figure out what to do.

    Admin
    Keymaster

    Did Dr. Devos check your dental and overall health thoroughly to make sure you were a candidate for dental implants before accepting your money and starting the procedures? If not, then it’s time to demand your money back and find a new dentist.

    If he did, then the problem is either your dentist doesn’t know how to properly place implants, or your bone isn’t dense enough for the implants to work. Have you had any bone grafts done to help support the implants and keep them in place? One thing’s for sure, you shouldn’t have to pay any addition fees until your implants work. But at the end of the day, your dentist’s responsibility depends on what it says in your agreement.

    I’d suggest getting an honest second opinion from another dentist to see if they think that implants will work for you. If not, then it’s time to try and get some of your money back and consider other restoration options (dentures).

    in reply to: Can I Sue My Dentist for Malpractice? #953
    Admin
    Keymaster

    Hi Greg,

    I am very sorry to hear about your situation and for your dentist’s lack of attention/treatment when you notified him of the tooth that was still in your gum tissue. His complete dismissal of your request and telling you to have your wife to pull the tooth are both ridiculous actions on his part and the offer of free care for life is definitely him admitting his mistake. I have a few questions to clarify some details:

    When did you finally demand the x-ray?
    Why did it take 3 years to get proper treatment?
    Did you consent to having a bone graft and implant done to replace the removed piece of tooth?
    You say the pain is getting worse. Has the implant/bone graft been removed?

    I have to say that I’m not a big fan of suing people, but I think you have an understandable reason to do so in this case. I would normally suggest that you accept the offer for free care, but it sounds like your dentist may no longer be capable of providing quality care. I suggest that you consult a legal professional who is familiar with dental cases to see if they think you have a case.

    The legal consultation might not be free, but 3 years of pain and difficulties is a long time so it might be worth doing everything you can to get some reimbursement/compensation. That said, I don’t think you’ll be able to do anything about the failed bone graft/implant (unless you can prove that the surgeon is guilty of malpractice) as those procedures sometimes fail unexpectedly – even if the conditions are ideal.

    All in all, it’s definitely time to find a new dentist!

    in reply to: Abutment & Crown Fell Out – Risk of Leaving a Hole? #888
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    Reply from Deborah:

    Thank you so much for your information. I will be seeking the treatment of a dentist in the near future. I am not feeling any movement in the implant, however, the crown and the post still are not as one with the implant. The tooth is easily removed, and that is not how it should be. Once again, you have been very informative. The tooth in question is right in front, so I do keep it in, and replace it when it falls out. I am vigilant about brushing and flossing, so that is a plus on my side. I just wish I could afford regular dental care as I did when I was working. Sigh. Have a great day.

    in reply to: Abutment & Crown Fell Out – Risk of Leaving a Hole? #877
    Admin
    Keymaster

    Thank you for providing the additional details.

    It sounds like the abutment (post that connects the implant and the artificial tooth) is the component that is coming loose while it is still attached to the crown/artificial tooth. Please reference the image below to confirm that this is the problem you’re describing.

    Next, make sure the implant isn’t loose. As long as the implant isn’t, the bone and gum tissue around it forms a tight seal that prevents any bacteria from seeping down and getting stuck between the implant and your bone and causing bone loss and implant failure. If it is, you should see your dentist ASAP.

    Food can get easily get trapped down inside the “hole” that has been left behind by the abutment/crown. If it isn’t removed completely from inside the implant or between the gums, bacteria will grow and you could develop an infection. Your situation isn’t necessarily high risk (you’ve been fine for 2 years), but definitely there is always a chance and you’re at a higher risk than if you had an abutment/crown properly in place.

    An abutment/crown that is poorly positioned or loose can also provide a space for food to be trapped in and cause an infection. For this reason, I would suggest not trying to re-attach and use the artificial tooth yourself even though it seems intuitive to try to put it back in when it falls out.

    To reduce the risk of infection, be sure to brush and floss regularly and visit your dentist on a consistent basis to get them to check on the status of your implant. Make sure you gently and thoroughly clean all food particles from in and around the “pocket” so that there is nowhere for bacteria to thrive.

    If you notice swelling, bleeding, receding, discolouration or pain in your gum tissue, consult your dentist immediately as you might be developing a peri-implant disease. If left untreated, the bacteria will start to damage the gum tissue and eventually cause bone loss around the implant. Damage to the gums may be successfully treated and is reversible if caught early on, but damage to the bone structure requires surgery to correct. See: http://www.perio.org/node/509

    Finally, it is important to note that your jawbone needs constant stimulation in order to maintain its form and density. The hundreds of chewing-related stresses that a tooth experiences every day prompt the bone beneath it to continually rebuild and change. Since you are missing an active tooth/implant, you’ll start to lose the width and height of alveolar bone in the area. An average of 25% of width is lost in the first year after a tooth is lost and 4mm in height is lost in the next few years.

    Please note that I am not a professional on the matter and that this is for informational purposes only. Please consult your dentist if you notice any problems.

    in reply to: Abutment & Crown Fell Out – Risk of Leaving a Hole? #875
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    Keymaster

    Deborah’s reply:

    I believe the implant itself is fine, however the post which is attached to the artificial tooth will not stay in the implant. I can easily remove the tooth,post attached, and when it is in place it has movement back and forth. It was cemented in once and that has failed. My concern is now that the artificial tooth is not secure and can be removed at any given time, is bacteria getting into the implant for the post and tooth?

    in reply to: Abutment & Crown Fell Out – Risk of Leaving a Hole? #874
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    Keymaster

    What part of the restoration (post, abutment or crown) needs to be repaired? Is the implant secure or is it a little bit loose?

    If the implant was put in by a dentist who is familiar with implants and assuming you haven’t had any issues in 2 years since it was put back in, then the risk of infection is minimal. Keep an eye on the area and be sure to practice good oral hygiene.

    Admin
    Keymaster

    Hi Sharri,

    I am very sorry to hear about your difficult situation. Thank you for taking the time to provide all of the details about yourself and what has happened to your teeth to date.

    If you haven’t already, I highly recommend reading this page to find one or more methods of saving money on implants that work for your situation. Getting work done at a school of dentistry or paying for the work with a financing plan can both make implants more accessible.

    In addition, have you considered any non-implant alternatives to implants? I was unable to get a completely clear picture of which teeth will need to be replaced, but removable partial dentures or fixed bridges would definitely be cheaper in any case and would function and look better than the rotting teeth you talk about. And from the sounds of it, getting those rotten teeth out of your mouth should be done ASAP!

    My last piece of advice is to consider starting a fundraising campaign using a website like Indiegogo.com or GoFundMe.com and ask you friends, family, local churches and any online communities you’re a part of to donate towards your dental work. Be sure to write a clear and detailed explanation of your situation (like you did here) and let people know how new teeth will positively impact your life and the lives of your kids. Having a link to direct people to when you post on a website makes it possible for people who feel like helping to donate to your cause.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)