Complete Dental Implant Cost Guide

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If you have recently lost a tooth from tooth decay, gum disease (gingivitis), periodontal disease or from injury, you have probably considered or have been curious about dental implants. This guide will give all the facts and cost related factors which will hopefully answer most (if not all) of your questions so you can decide whether dental implants are the right choice for you.

In This Guide

What is a Dental Implant?

A dental implant is an artificial tooth root. It is inserted into the jaw to permanently or temporarily hold artificial teeth in place. It is typically made out of titanium which is biocompatible with the jaw bone. The direct fusing of bone and an implant is called osseointegration which is a special characteristic of titanium. When a tooth is lost, some bone that helped support the tooth is also lost. Dental implants help stabilize the jaw, preventing future bone loss and maintaining the jaw bone’s shape. Implants are a convenient alternative to dentures because they never have to be taken out and they feel much more natural and comfortable. They are better than traditional bridges and crowns because they aren’t just cemented in place. When mounted to implants, bridges and dentures won’t shift or slip in your mouth, which can make talking and eating easier and worry-free. This also avoids other common problems such as gagging, poor alignment and sore spots.

Parts of a tooth implant

There are 2 main types of implants. One is called endosteal. This type is implanted directly into the jaw and holds one or more teeth in place. The other type is subperiosteal. This implant is a metal frame that is placed on top of the jaw below the gums. Posts protrude through the gums to hold the prosthesis. This type isn’t as common, but can be used for patients who have minimal jaw height or thickness.

To be qualified for an implant, one must have strong, healthy gums and jawbone in order to support it and hold it in place. Routine visits to the dentist and dedicated, comprehensive oral hygiene are both required to maintain implants in the long term (no more skipping brushing your teeth now and then).

The Procedure

Before the surgery can take place, meticulous planning must be completed to identify and analyze nerves, the sinus and the shape and dimensions of the bone in and around the area of interest. During the preliminary examination, your dentist or surgeon will take x-rays of your jaw; paying specific attention to the area that requires a dental implant(s). Different scans can also be taken including a panoramic radiograph, which can show all the upper and lower teeth and bone structure to determine bone health, height and thickness. CT scans are the most accurate form of x-ray imaging to date and may also be used to analyze and determine a treatment plan. Your teeth and gums will be examined for disease and decay and treated prior to the procedure.

periodontist performing surgery on a patient

Getting implants is an outpatient procedure and can be performed at your local dentist’s office. The operation requires some form of anesthesia including local, general, intravenous sedation or nitrous oxide. Dentists, periodontists and oral surgeons can all perform the surgery. Here is how to find a dentist you can trust.

The surgery itself is normally done in several stages. In the first stage, incisions are made into the gum to expose the bone. A hole is then drilled into the bone so that the implant can be placed. The implant is inserted completely into the jaw bone and lies below the gum tissue (see below). The tissue is then stitched back into place or a temporary covering is used protect the gap from forces such as chewing. As the surrounding bone and gum tissues heal, the implant bonds itself to the bone. The healing process typically takes 4-6 months.

Once the osseointegration is complete, you have to go back to get the abutment installed. The abutment is a post that penetrates through the gums and connects the replacement tooth (or crown) to the implant. The gums above the implant are reopened to install the abutment. This is another outpatient surgery and requires only local anesthesia. Once it is successfully placed, the gum is then closed up around but not over the abutment. In some cases it is possible to install both the implant and the abutment during the same surgery since research has shown that doing so has no detrimental effects as long as adequate time is given for everything to heal. In this case, it is important to note that the post will be visible and care must be taken not to apply any pressure to it during the healing process.

It takes about 2 weeks for your gums to heal before you can finish the procedure. As with any surgical procedure, there will be swelling, bruising, minor pain and bleeding during the healing process. There are several ways to relieve the pain and discomfort during the recovery period.

Next the artificial tooth is made from impressions of your teeth and a model of your bite to ensure that it fits in naturally. Then it is attached to the abutment (it can take several appointments to get the fit just right). A removable prosthesis (or bridge) is conventional if you had more than one tooth replaced. It is also more affordable then implanting each tooth separately as it only takes one implant on either side to span an area and hold several artificial teeth in place. It is similar to dentures, but the difference is that it snaps into place for a more permanent and natural fit.

Advantages and Risks

There are many advantages to tooth implants. It is a permanent solution to tooth loss that is more durable and stable than alternatives such as conventional dentures, crowns or bridges which can make it easier to speak and eat. They also fit more comfortably and naturally and even look better cosmetically which can improve your self-esteem. Convenience is another huge advantage as they do not need to be removed, cleaned or kept in place by messy adhesives. They also improve oral health by making it easier to clean between teeth and they do not require modifications to nearby healthy teeth in order to be installed.

Advantages

  • Permanent and durable
  • Can be more cost effective over many years
  • Natural and comfortable fit
  • Look and function more like regular teeth
  • Require less maintenance
  • Don’t require modifications to adjacent teeth
  • 95%+ success rates

The risks are minimal as problems and causes of failure are rare and are often easily treated. They include but are not limited to: the bone not integrating with the implant, bleeding, injury or numbness of the nearby muscles or sinus cavity due to nerve damage and the chance of infection if the implant breaks, the crown becomes loose or a lack of proper oral hygiene. Success rates depend on a number of factors including the size and strength of the jaw bone and where in the jaw the implant is placed, but overall they are well above 90% (up to 98% if they are properly cared for) and are always improving. More specifically, the success rate is around 90% for the upper jaw and 95% for lower jaw implants. This is because the bone in the upper jaw is less dense than the lower jaw which makes successful osseointegration more difficult.

Risks/Disadvantages

  • Major investment
  • Bone not accepting the implant
  • Pain, swelling and bleeding due to surgery
  • Nerve damage of adjacent muscles or sinus cavity
  • Infection due to breaks and looseness

Average Cost and Factors

Tooth implants are typically more expensive than more traditional alternatives. The cost depends on a number of factors including what dentist or surgeon you go to, the type of implant and procedure, how many and which teeth you need replaced, how many implants are required to support these teeth, how much insurance coverage you have and your geographical location. Once you get an examination and talk with your dentist, they will be able to provide you with a price estimate. A single tooth implant typically costs $1000 to $3,000. However, if additional procedures such as bone grafts, extractions and extensive imaging and/or modelling are required, the price can easily inflate to $5,000 to $10,000. Your dentist will be able to give you an idea of what costs you are looking at after a preliminary examination.

Single Tooth Implant CostAdd to your site

Cost of Additional ProceduresAdd to your site

An implant is only part of the process though. An abutment and crown for a single tooth adds an extra $500 to $3,000. The average total cost paid by consumers for all procedures, abutment, crown and implant is $4,250. A 3 or 4 tooth bridge mounted on two implants can cost anywhere from $5,000 to $15,000 (the average being $8,500). A full set of upper and lower implant supported dentures ranges from $25,000 to $95,000 (average of $34,000), depending heavily on the condition of your gums, jaw bone and existing teeth (if any).

Average Multi Implant CostAdd to your site

Some people opt to travel to foreign countries to take advantage of their cheaper prices for tooth implants. A few of the most popular destinations include South and Eastern Europe, India, Philippines and Africa.

Dental Implant Cost by CountryAdd to your site

If you receive a quote or see an advertised price that looks too good to be true, it most likely is. Safe, high quality and long lasting implants come at a price that depends on a variety of factors. Some or all of these factors may or may not be included in a particular estimate.

Factors That Can Affect the Cost

  • Brand, material and type of post, abutment and crown
  • Cost of the surgery
  • How many and what teeth need to be replaced
  • The particular dentist/surgeon’s experience, specialty & popularity
  • How many professionals are involved in your case
  • Creation of the prosthodontics
  • Additional procedures such as sinus elevation and bone grafting

When getting a quote, remember that the total fee includes various aspects of the procedure. There is the cost of the procedure and implant, the cost of the abutment and the cost of the crown or dentures. There could be added charges for the scans, anesthetic and modelling as well.

Insurance Coverage

The first thing you should do is to check with your insurance company to see if implants are covered on your plan. If it isn’t, then you can talk with your dentist’s office to find out if they provide or can recommend other payment plans/options. Remember that your dentist is there for you and will help you in any way that they and give you all the information you need so don’t be hesitant to ask. Unfortunately, many insurance plans cover 10% or less of the total cost of implants, but provide significantly more coverage for more traditional solutions such as dentures. This is often because most companies classify implants and a cosmetic procedure. Surgical costs can be covered by health insurance in some instances.

While losing a tooth can be stressful – remember that there are a number of options available to you, including dental implants. It might seem scary when reading about it, but there is minimal pain, risk and discomfort and the results are lasting and natural looking. Talk to your dentist about implants if you think they might be the solution for you.

Tell us about your experience with dental implants so that others can benefit from hearing about how much you paid, where you got it done as well as any successes or problems you experienced.

What People Are Paying - Recent Comments

  1. John M says:

    I’ve had two experiences with dental implant surgery over the past few years. Two years ago I had a tooth replaced that I lost playing hockey. In total I paid $3000 which included the implant, crown and abutment so based on the numbers provided I guess I did pretty well. Then again two months ago I had to have several teeth removed that were damaged by periodontitis according to my dentist. These teeth were right beside my first implant so I’m wondering if the first one could have caused the gum disease? Anyway, this time it cost me just under $10,000.

    I’ve spent quite a bit on the surgeries, but I look at it as a long-term investment. Nobody wants to do business with a businessman with half his teeth missing.

    • Courtney F says:

      Went to see Dr. Rigali in Montevideo, Uruguay 1.5 years ago for two dental implants with crowns, etc.: $1,950 total for everything including crowns. Just returned from Uruguay again one-month ago: one bridge removal, two underlying tooth extractions, two bone implants, one titanium implant placement (two more to go), 20-stitches (followed in 8-days by removal of stitches), medications, et al., total cost: $960 . . . with only 1-hour and 15-minutes in his chair and no pain during and very little pain (indeed, almost none) after the surgery.

      Cost should not be the primary consideration when selecting a dentist for your implant, but experience: how many implants (and thus experience) does he have is the primary question. Oral surgeons here with 7-to-75 implant experience wanted $5,000-to-$7,000 per tooth. My decision was based upon “How much experience” rather than “How many dollars.”

      My decision to go to Uruguay was made when he answered “Thousands and thousands” to my inquiry of “How many have you done?” Cost is the lesser half of the equation. One of the dentists here wanted to book a half-a-day in his chair for the procedure . . . Yikes! Don’t go abroad for cost saving only and don’t have it done here by somebody here with only limited experience. Try and find both together.
      Courtney

      • Nai Tsao says:

        Implant procedures(implant, abutement, crown) requires healing time last for 6 months(?) from start to finish. Do you stay several months in Uruguay after implant surgery and before abutement and crown can be installed?

  2. Lea says:

    Thanks for the information. I am going through 2 upper implants including sinus augmentation with bone. It’s giving me moderate pain, and fever. I wonder about the cost and why it so expensive in USA. Your site is well done and explains more than I got at the dentist’s office, although the work done was pretty good.
    Lea

    • Deanna Jones says:

      Why does any medical procedure cost so much more in the USA than in other countries? Ridiculous.

      • Daniel Domagala says:

        It starts with average dental student graduating with $300,000 in debt. Specialists go to mid 400s. Then it is the cost of american standards in medicine where phisicians and dentists are charged extra for medical buildouts, medical rent, medical equipment etc. US doctors of all doctors pay the highest prices for the same products. In addition, there is a high cost of running a practice, payroll etc. I hope that helps.

  3. Rolando Aplicano DDS says:

    Very well explained site, thank you for that. I’m a dentist from Honduras and around here the average cost is around $1300 US including implant placement, abutments and ceramic crown, (additional procedures not included). I, in particular, use implants from MIS (Israel) and so far no problems regarding post op, quality and looks, I also have used implants from Zimmer (USA) and Bio Horizons also (USA).

    • Carla Wilkinson says:

      How many trips to Honduras and how many days of stay in each trip would be required for a two front tooth (9-10) implants? I would also need a crown in #8 (in the moment I have bridge 8-9-10. 8 is still savable, but 9 and 10 need implant. 9 is the missing tooth.

  4. Ken says:

    I paid $41,500 to have all my teeth done on 4 implants in Denver, Colorado. I had my surgery on 6-18-2013. It took a full 7 days for the swelling to come down. I’m now to the point where I only need painkiller to sleep at night. Anyone considering this procedure should make sure you have a lot of ice packs that you can attach to your face on hand before going home.

    • Donna says:

      How long was the total procedure, was it done in several steps? Are you from the Denver area and is that why you chose there?

    • Dave says:

      Ken,

      I would be very interested in where you had your surgery done.

      I also live in Denver. After a referral from my dentist, I talked to an oral surgeon. following two or three appointments, I scheduled my surgery. The dream of having a beautiful smile was over when I realized the cost of the implants. I was quoted approximately 32,000 dollars for acrylic implants, plastic. I still want the surgery, just wish it was more in my price range.

      • Nancy says:

        Hi Dave,
        I live in Tampa Fl, and I am in the process of getting implants for my upper teeth.
        Due to dry mouth from medication, my teeth became decayed.

        Due to the extensive amount of work I was looking at and for financial reasons (no insurance, cash only) and a fantastic dentist, rather than loosing all of my teeth my dentist was kind enough to refer me to the dental school where HE TEACHES. (this is my personal dentist that I have been going to for years).

        Fortunately he was able to save all of my lower teeth by crowning them (porcelain) @ $410.00 each as opposed to $800-$1,200 a piece.

        On the other hand, we couldn’t save my upper teeth. so in the meantime I am working with a denture until my surgeries are completed. (If you’re doing a full arch you will need a denture to protect your gums, during the healing period)

        As far as my implants, my dentist referred me to an oral surgeon who he works with, the OS will be performing the surgeries (6 implants + abutments) once everything is healed, I will then get my crowns (porcelain) made and placed by my dentist @ the school. It seems like a lot of work to get two dentists willing to work together, but if you can it will save you a lot of money in the long run. The crowns alone are saving me approximately $8,000-$10,000.

        Also don’t forget for every two crowns, you only need one implant, this is a huge savings. Do not let a dentist tell you that you need an implant for every tooth (crown), NOT TRUE.

        Do your homework! Shop around, ask questions, don’t be embarrassed to call the dental schools. Remember you’re the one paying not your dentist.

        BTW, when getting work done @ a dental school, all of the is performed by a licensed dentist, students are there to assist and learn, they are not permitted to perform any work on patients other than a regular cleaning.

        Good Luck

    • Blair says:

      Hi Ken,
      I am from the Denver area and I am looking for a dentist to do all my teeth as well. Would you recommend your dentist? Are you satisfied with the final outcome?
      Oh, and I was also wondering if you had the procedure done in one day or over the course of several visits?
      Thanks!

    • John says:

      Wow Ken, that sounds tough to get them all pulled at once. I am just recovering from another abcessed tooth, my teeth are rottening out fast and I’m thinking about what I want to do with the rest of my teeth. After going through this abcessed tooth, I don’t want to feel this pain again!!!! Plus the cost of the dentist filling the tooth is a total loss. I need to talk to the surgeon and work out a plan, I was thinking maybe pulling 1/4 or 1/2 of the teeth at a time…..
      Good Luck, and I hope your new teeth turn out as good or better than the originals.

      • Palmer says:

        John, I had the same problem. I had 3 trips for extractions, upper, lower, and front over a 10 day period. One of the best things I have ever done for myself. Mine were rotting very fast. I was on antibiotics for about 30 days after. My overall health improved. I had no idea that infected, absessed teeth could be so hard on a body; it was causing heart palpatations. Everybody thought it was an emotional problem, but after the extractions they stopped. I have dentures, but I’m tired of huge chunks of plastic in my mouth along with oozing denture goo. I guess I’ll just have to deal with it until I hit the lucky numbers….these prices are unreal! Good Luck to you.

      • Nancy says:

        Hi John,

        You should check out the dental schools in your area.
        Dental school prices are discounted usually 50 to 70%.

        Just an example, I had to have my upper teeth pulled (11 of them), it cost me in total $440.00, that’s $40.00 a tooth. huge savings.
        Good Luck!

    • Nancy says:

      Hi Ken, when you say all of your teeth on 4 implants, how many teeth are you talking about.

      Thank you
      Nancy

      • Hi Ken and Nancy,

        The “all on four” procedure is a concept where all diseased teeth are removed from one jaw and 4 to 6 implants placed strategically so that a set of teeth is screwed immediately that same day! It has been a wonderful option for many of my patients that have avoided denture therapy. In New York, I am charging $29,500 and includes the surgery, same day teeth and a second final set of teeth months later. Notice how i mentioned surgery…and not surgeries! Consider this option by doctors that have trained to do so. Dental schools have students and/or recent graduates working on you and they’re supervised. But note the amount of ‘time lost in your life’ in going that route as well as your reduced fee is only because students are learning on your case, mouth, and from the supervising dentist that is present. Hope my insights guide you well.

  5. JULIANA says:

    As of yesterday I have now had a dozen implants done within the last 10 years or so. I have experienced almost no pain other than financial. My best advice would be to choose your surgeon very carefully. I live in Simi Valley California and highly recommend mine. Good luck and keep on smiling.

  6. Karen says:

    Am I reading this correct??? I have a tooth that may require to be removed and an implant put in its place…is there going to be a time that I will NOT have a tooth there?
    The location is top front, I can not have a front tooth missing for any period of time! I smile way too much! :-)

    • Dr Campos says:

      Karen, don’t worry 99.9% of the time when an implant is placed in the aesthetic zone your dentist will make sure that a temporary provisional is made even before the extraction, sometimes it is done in the same day. Remember that every case is different, when you loose a tooth due to periodontal disease chances are you might need a bone graft. But if you loose a tooth due to decay or trauma the approach is different.

  7. Geraldine alongi says:

    I am having 4 endosteal inplants @ 750.00 each for the top to take a full denture for stability. 7 extractions on the bottom,150.00 each. 6 endosteal implants at 1,500.each which includes Hybrid 7,500. and complete denture maxillary1,500.The total cost will come to 22,050. This dentist comes highly recommended. I feel I’m getting a great deal, esp. if I should have any problems I will not have to worry about getting on a plane and flying out of the country. She also said that she will guarrantee all work.

    • Janice says:

      I just read your comments on dental implants and all the work you had. I am going to have almost the same thing you just went through. Where are you and your dentist located?

  8. Bruce Chandler says:

    WHERE ARE YOU LOCATED? WHO IS YOUR DENTIST? I’M IN VANCOUVER BC AND HAVE RECENTLY HAD 10 IMPLANTS FOR A TOTAL COST OF AROUND $50,000. BASED ON THAT I THINK YOU’RE GETTING A GREAT DEAL ….. FOR FUTURE IMPLANT WORK I MAY LOOK TO YOUR DENTIST.
    WOULD BE INTERESTED TO HERE HOW YOU MAKE OUT.
    THANKS ….

  9. L Gray says:

    I’ve had several implants, both single and bridges, over the past 5 yrs. The cost for a single was $4000 and the cost for the bridges (lower left and right bottom, spanning 4 teeth with 2 implants) was $13,000. All procedures were done in Pennsylvania.

  10. Bill says:

    I have recently been quoted approximately $34,000 for the following: surgical removal of 4 lower front teeth, removal of cyst, bone graft of mandible using rhBMP, two implants w/4 crowns. Fees include anesthesia, lab tests, etc. Work being done by oral surgeon and prosthodontist. This seems very high to me but would love an opinion. thx.

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